canada

Fishing Canada: Volume 1

Alberta to Nova Scotia

By Debbie Kay

As a part of the Sunday Series, Angler’s Club Magazine has put together a brief list of fishing information to help you plan your fishing vacations next year.  Here is a quick look at the territories and Provinces of Canada, what to catch and where to start.canada

 

Alberta

Season:  Mostly spring thru fall.

Best Known For:  Trout, cold water lake and stream fish, some interior salmon or steelhead possible.

Fishing License Agency:  Environment and Parks.

Link to online license purchase 

Cost of a Visitor’s License: $28 dollars a day, $47.63 dollars for 5 days, $70.90 dollars annual.  All prices are in Canadian Dollars.

British Columbia

Season: Year-round.

Best Known For: Saltwater fishing for salmon and halibut; trout, salmon and steelhead in the rivers, some reservoir and lake fishing.

Fishing License Agency:  Department of the Environment, Department of Fisheries and Oceans.

Link to online license purchase

Cost of a Visitor’s License: A freshwater/non-Canadian citizens license is $80 dollars a year, $20 dollars a day, $50 dollars a week.  Saltwater licenses are $106.05 dollars for an annual license, $32.55 dollars for five days and $7.35dollars for day.  Salmon stamps are an extra $6.30.  All prices are in Canadian Dollars.

Manitoba

Season:  Mostly spring thru fall.

Best Known For: Char, grayling, trout, channel catfish, pike, walleye, bass.

Fishing License Agency:  Fish and Wildlife.

Link to online license purchase:  No online site exists to fill out a license.  They must be purchased in person, or you can fill out an application – available here – and mail it in.  It will take four weeks approximately to get a license returned to you in the mail.

Cost of a Visitor’s License: $58.29 dollars for a regular license, $33.26 dollars for a conservation license.  A conservation license has bigger limits on some species.  All prices are in Canadian Dollars.

New Brunswick

Season:  Year-round, with ice fishing in the winter.

Best Known For: Cold water lake fish, North Atlantic fishing.

Fishing License Agency:  Department of Natural Resources, Department of Fisheries and Oceans.

Link to online license purchase

Cost of a Visitor’s License: Freshwater licenses are $138 dollars per year for a season, either class 1 or live release.  $75 dollars a week plus a $20 dollar conservation fee.  Saltwater licenses run $106.05 dollars for an annual license, $32.55 dollars for 5 days or $7.35 dollars for a day.  Salmon stamps are an extra $6.30 dollars.  All prices are in Canadian Dollars.

Newfoundland

Season:  Year-round with ice fishing.

Best Known For: Cold water lake fish, North Atlantic fishing.

Fishing License Agency:  Environment and Conservation.

Link to online license purchase

Cost of a Visitor’s License: Freshwater licenses are $53 dollars for salmon angling, $8 dollars for trout angling.  Saltwater licenses are $106.05 dollars for an annual license, $32.55 dollars for five days or $7.35 dollars for one day.  Salmon stamps are an extra $6.30 dollars.  All prices are in Canadian Dollars.

Northwest Territories

Season:  Mostly spring thru fall.

Best Known For: Trout streams and some reservoirs.  Excellent cold water mountain streams.

Fishing License Agency:  Environment and Natural Resources.

Link to online license purchase

Cost of a Visitor’s License:  $40 dollars a year for non-Canadians.  All prices are in Canadian Dollars.

Nova Scotia

Season: Year-round.

Best Known For: Cold water lake fish, angling and North Atlantic saltwater fishing.

Fishing License Agency:  Department of Fisheries and Oceans; Fisheries and Aquaculture.

Link to online license purchase

Cost of a Visitor’s License: Freshwater licenses are $61 dollars per season for non-salmon angling.  Saltwater licenses run $106.05 dollars for an annual license, $32.55 dollars for for 5 days or $7.35 dollars for a day.  Salmon stamps are an extra $6.30 dollars.  All prices are in Canadian Dollars

 

 

Do you have any fish stories or comments about your favorite province to fish?  Any additional information  you’d like to see in our series?  Let us know.  Please leave your thoughts in the comments below.  Happy Fishing!

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