Tag Archives: Fly fishing

Mythical Fly Fishing Trips & Gorgeous Scenery

Mythical Fly Fishing Trips by Sean Obrien

There are mythical fly fishing trips taken by fly fisherman to some of the most profoundly gorgeous scenery available on the planet. Although there are thousands of locations that are world reknown for their unrivaled fly fishing, they all have specific positives and negatives. Each one of the locations listed below has a distinct reason that makes it one of the few end-all be-all locations for the fly fishing enthusiast.  Some are specific because of the
environment, some for the location, and some for the species of fish available, but the one thing they all have in common is unparalleled angling.  Let’s get right to the list, and be sure to leave your mythical fly fishing trips or dream destination in the comments section below. Continue reading Mythical Fly Fishing Trips & Gorgeous Scenery

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Salmon Fly Fishing for the East Coast

Salmon Fly Fishing by Sean Obrien

Some of the best salmon fly fishing in the United States is relatively tough to get to by normal standards.  Two places that come to mind almost immediately are The great Northwest, and Alaska.  There are naturally many other areas in the USA as well, but those are two of the best in the world.  A little bit closer to home for those of us on the East Coast would be ideal for that fall salmon fly fishing trip.   Perhaps the best spot on this half of the United States is Pulaski, NY.  This small sleepy town in Oswego County has a population of 2,365 as of the 2010 census.  But it also has a 2 month period in September and October where the Coho and King salmon are spawning, and the fly fishing is absolutely insane.  The aptly named Salmon River is home to some of the best salmon fishing anywhere, and definitely the best on or near the eastern half of the USA. .

Anglers line up shoulder to shoulder for the opportunity to catch a coho or king salmon as they make their annual run up the river.  The fish seem to mill around the estuary, and then race up the river in spurts. Some of the fish can be in excess of 40 pounds and will put up a hell of a fight. One of the best methods is to use salmon eggs, because the fish are going upstream to spawn.  If they see a random egg floating in the water the natural instinct is to grab it and hold it in their mouth, which will lead to a hook set.  Hopefully.  The fish are not as aggressive in Pulaski as you would think, but there are spurts where you can barely see the river bottom because of all the salmon. These groupings of fish occur as they swim upriver from the estuary where Lake Ontario meets New York.  The king and coho salmon are not native to the area, but have thrived since their introduction into the ecosystem in the 1960’s. Now, there is a huge game fish population in this area, and the trout and salmon, as well as smallmouth bass make this a great destination for a Salmon Fly Fishing trip.

The only method of fishing that is banned on the Salmon River is snagging, because at certain points in the day, the fish are so plentiful running upstream that you can throw a treble hook of any bare hook and rip it through the water and you would probably snag something.  There is also a requirement on the way weights are tied to lines, as the authorities do not allow a sliding weight, so there is no chance of it dropping to the hook and allowing you to snag easier.  That said, the typical setup is a small weight about 48” from the hook, rigged with  a salmon egg.

There are a ton of essential items to insure safety in the cold water streams in late September and early October.  The most essential is a pair of insulated waders, as you will be spending quite a bit  of time in knee to waist deep water, and it is not warm.  Gloves, and any and all other cold weather essentials will be a benefit out here.  It is also recommended that the anglers wear studded or cleated shoes to avoid slipping and falling in the river.  Polarized sunglasses are also a must, as when the river is clear, you will be able to sight fish and pick your spots.

Although spinning rods continue to dominate the day, fly fishing has been a growing segment of the angler population on the Salmon River.  Drifting streamers and egg patterns down the river during a run will inevitably lead to a hook up with some monster fish.  As you see them darting up the river in the clear water, you feel like you can dive in and bare hand them.  We will take a look at techniques and tips for both spinning and fly fishing for these monsters next, so be sure to check back with us for all your salmon fly fishing information.

 

 

 

 

 

Master the Fly Fishing Basics

Fly Fishing Basics by Sean Obrien

Fly fishing is a lot like golf – real mastery only comes once you’ve developed strong fundamentals.  Without mastering the fly fishing basics, the flashier, more advanced techniques will be impossible.  It’s infinitely easier to learn the proper technique to start with than it is to break bad habits that have already formed.

Fly Fishing Basics

But “fundamentals” is a broad topic.  There are many tricks to help perfect your casting form, or tie the correct knots for each connection of your rod and reel combo.  But all of that is wasted if you can’t find the fish.  Ultimately, you’ll need all three of these skills  to start succeeding as a fly fisherman. With that said, here are some tips, tricks and techniques for mastering the basics of fly fishing. Continue reading Master the Fly Fishing Basics

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Fall Fly Fishing Rivals Spring

Fall Fly Fishing by Sean Obrien

Fall fly fishing rivals spring as a great time to go after those elusive trout. Trout fishing in the fall is my favorite time, as the air and water get colder, and the sun is still shining and offering up a little warmth.  As the rivers and streams get lower and lower, and the air gets colder and colder, make sure you have the opportunity to get out there a few times to close out the season.

Water temperatures are a big benefit to the fall fly fishing season, as sometimes cooler water results in lethargic trout.  This means morning and night might not be the best times to go fishing.  The best time to fish might be afternoon, when the water is warmer, and the sun is overhead, making it more comfortable for both you and the fish.  Remember to dress to impress, as clearer water and lower sun means fish can see you much better than when the water is higher and cloudier from particles and sediments.  Muted colors, nothing bright, and try to blend in with the background foliage as best as you can.  Overhead sun due to fishing in the afternoon also results in longer shadows that may spook fish, so the angler will need to take into account where they are in relation to the sun.

Trout spawn in fall,  which causes them to become more aggressive and, in the case of brown and brook trout, willing to eat more often than in spring.  Rainbows seem to be voracious no matter what, and all three types will eat any eggs that they may come into contact with, so egg patterns might be beneficial.  It is still a great idea to match the catch, as mayflies are still hatching, especially when the wind is calm and the temperature is higher.  Dry flies work well in all seasons, but in fall fly fishing, the water is clearer because the sediment is not getting churned up as much.  The problem is all the leaves and twigs and nuts and debris falling off the trees and into the water might make it tough for the fish to notice your fly.  Just putting a little twitch as you float could make the difference, and help the fly catch the eye of a fish.

Streamers are great in fall as well, because, as stated before, the water is clearer and the fish are more aggressive overall. Although this does not mean you will see or catch more trout in the fall than in the spring, the spawning fish make for some interesting excursions.  As the summer hatch winds down, small bugs, crickets and beetles become very large parts of a trout’s diet.  Try to maximize your fall fly fishing  chances by testing out not only different patterns, but different sizes and weights of flies.  And anytime you feel like you might have something to do and you won’t be able to get out there, just remember, in a few short months, you will be counting down until opening day 2017.

 

 

The Best Small Stream Fishing in Washington (Part 2 of trout fishing series)

These 5 Small Stream Creeks and Rivers Give the Classic Fly Fishing Experience

Small Stream By Will Jukes

Updated. We spend a lot of time around here talking about fishing the big rivers in the Columbia River basin, or the open waters of the Pacific Coast.  And why wouldn’t we?  They’re great fisheries, and unique to small streamthe Pacific Northwest.  Small stream fishing – little fish, tight casts, long hikes and 2 to 4-weight rods – often takes a backseat.  It’s easy enough to find those streams in other states, places like Colorado, Idaho and Montana.  So why spend time on that when Washington has so much of its own fishing to offer? Continue reading The Best Small Stream Fishing in Washington (Part 2 of trout fishing series)

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